About

Poligots is a political resource and soapbox inspiring women and their co-conspirators to create politically conscious and active households.”

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8 Responses

  1. i grew up in glasgow, went to high school in missoula, so yes am born & bred montanan.

    did you go to high school in bigfork? what year did you graduate? my nephews were at school in bigfork.

    you can email me back at my email address above if you like, taking the convo away from blueoregon

  2. Shawn said some nice things about her dad’s politicking, so i’ll say a bit about her grandfather’s social/political history. As a boy in upper New Jersey in the early 1900’s, Pete watched as the KKK came to cross the river to drive the Irish out of his hometown. Bad move – Pete’s and other immigrant families met them on the bridge and none of the Klan got across. In 1939, while Hitler was invading Poland, some American Nazis began harassing a Polish immigrant in a bar in Miami. Pete and his brother and a handful of other fighting Irish were called and did the New Jersey thing – no Nazis were left unbruised. Another time, the Miami Klan threatened violence to Pete after he posted bail for a black man. His response to them cannot be repeated in a family blog.
    This is not to extol harsh behavior; it is to remember a straightforward man who probably never wrote a political letter, certainly never marched for this or against that, never needed someone else to tell him the rightness of things, the occasional need for direct action. Thanks, Pete, from three generations of us.

  3. Hi Shawn and MamaKristin,

    My name is Kyrsten Bean and I work at Seal Press. I came across your blog while I was doing research for our book The Maternal is Political: Women Writers at the Intersection of Motherhood and Social Change (Seal Press / May 2008) edited by Shari MacDonald Strong. Because your site specifically addresses the intersections between motherhood and activism, I wanted to let you know about our title. Strong is a Portland local and doing an event at Powell’s Bookstore in Portland on May 29th at 7:30pm and I thought you or your community would be interested in attending.

    This book is a collection of essays by mothers “at the intersection of Motherhood and Social Change”. Topics range from post-partum depression to the war in Iraq and how they tie in politically to being a mother in this day and age. We really want to reach out to the mothers and potential mothers who are activists and let them know about this candid, powerful and truly inspiring read. We’d love to send you an advanced readers copy to preview, and/or giveaway on your blog or to your community, and please let us know if there is any way we can work with you, since we are both so passionate about motherhood and politics.

    Feel free to contact us for more information! We love your site!

    Best,
    Kyrsten Bean
    Seal Press

  4. Kristin,
    Hi. I love your blog/website. I love you and Philip. I’m so happy to be reconnected. How do I email you directly? Email me at andrea@andreaaskowitz.com

    Thank you for putting my book on your site and for saying nice things about it. I ended up not coming to Portland. Bummer. I also love the title of your book, Changing More than Diapers. Is that it? Awesome. Do it.

    I love your summer reading list for kids. I’m going to print it out and order all these books at my local bookstore.

    Love,
    Andrea

  5. I really dig the blog. How does one contact you folks? (My email me is “fitness for the occasion”: all one word, gmail).

  6. I like the blog, thanks for your efforts.

    Also, somehow it seems pleasantly cathartic to be called a “co-conspirator.”

  7. Poligots,

    I just have a quick question for you but couldn’t find an email so had to resort to this. I am a progressive blogger. Please email me back at barbaraobrien@maacenter.org when you get a chance. Thanks.

    Barbara

  8. Shawn said some nice things about her dad’s politicking, so i’ll say a bit about her grandfather’s social/political history. As a boy in upper New Jersey in the early 1900′s, Pete watched as the KKK came to cross the river to drive the Irish out of his hometown. Bad move – Pete’s and other immigrant families met them on the bridge and none of the Klan got across. In 1939, while Hitler was invading Poland, some American Nazis began harassing a Polish immigrant in a bar in Miami. Pete and his brother and a handful of other fighting Irish were called and did the New Jersey thing – no Nazis were left unbruised. Another time, the Miami Klan threatened violence to Pete after he posted bail for a black man. His response to them cannot be repeated in a family blog. This is not to extol harsh behavior; it is to remember a straightforward man who probably never wrote a political letter, certainly never marched for this or against that, never needed someone else to tell him the rightness of things, the occasional need for direct action. Thanks, Pete, from three generations of us.
    +1

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